Last edited by Nikasa
Saturday, May 2, 2020 | History

2 edition of religion of China. found in the catalog.

religion of China.

Max Weber

religion of China.

by Max Weber

  • 197 Want to read
  • 17 Currently reading

Published by The Free Press in New York .
Written in English


The Physical Object
Pagination308
Number of Pages308
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL20172254M

“Religion in a State Society: China” Myron L. Cohen I. INTRODUCTION: CENTRAL POINTS China, the world’s largest society both now and in pre-industrial times, provides an excellent case for consideration of the multifaceted role of religion in the expression of social and political Size: KB. Religion, human beings’ relation to that which they regard as holy, sacred, absolute, spiritual, divine, or worthy of especial reverence. It is also commonly regarded as consisting of the way people deal with ultimate concerns about their lives and their fate after many traditions, this relation and these concerns are expressed in terms of one’s relationship with or attitude.

  Over the past four decades, China has witnessed a religious revival, in particular with a significant increase in Christian believers. The number of Chinese Protestants has grown by an average of 10 percent annually since Some estimates indicate that China is on track to have the world’s largest population of Christians by Alchemy, Medicine and Religion in the China of A.D. The Nei Pien of Ko Hung and a great selection of related books, art and collectibles available now at

  Instead of religion, Johnson notes that China is seeing an awakening of ritual and of faith (xinyang). He understands ritual the same way Plato has the Athenian Stranger discuss nomoi, the customs and mores of a society. Indeed, the book is structured around the annual cycle of traditional festivals that are returning.   The Souls of China is, on the surface, an impressive anthology of Johnson’s interviews—conducted mostly between and —with a cast of characters whose lives exemplify the resurgence of religion in contemporary China. These include Christians in Chengdu, folk religion pilgrims in Beijing, Daoists in Shanxi, and assorted spiritual gurus.


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Religion of China by Max Weber Download PDF EPUB FB2

Still, you can’t keep religion down, and after Mao died inas soon as the s there was a reflowering of practices which had previously been banned, as related in your second book pick, Qigong Fever by David Palmer. When I was in China in the s, and further back in the s, there was a movement called Qigong.

Yang's book is an interesting endeavor into the complicated nature of not only religion and the state, but specifically religion and the Communist point of view in China. While there are clearly stated facts with good data and sources, I did notice some parts of the text that did Cited by: This is collection of essays by the scholar, Raphael Israeli, who is one of the few experts of Islam in China and of the Hui Muslims.

The book covers many aspects of the Hui community in 18 chapters which include their beliefs, mythology, history, sociology, culture, politics, place within Chinese society and Cited by: The folk religion of central-northern China (North China Plain), otherwise, is focused on the communal worship of tutelary deities of creation and nature as identitary symbols, by villages populated by families of different surnames, structured into "communities of the god(s)" (shénshè 神社, or huì 会, "association"), which organise.

Chinese folk religion (simplified Chinese: 中国民间信仰; traditional Chinese: 中國民間信仰; pinyin: Zhōngguó mínjiān xìnyǎng) is a polyphyletic term used to describe the diversity of practices in areas generally termed "religion," of persons of Chinese heritage, including the Chinese ne Wee described it as "an empty bowl, which can variously be filled with the.

China banned a book titled "Xing Fengsu" ("Sexual Customs") which insulted Islam and placed its authors under arrest in after protests in Lanzhou and Beijing by Chinese Hui Muslims, during which the Chinese police provided protection to the Hui Muslim protesters, and the Chinese government organized public burnings of the book.

DOI link for Religion in China. Religion in China book. A Brief Account of the Three Religions of the Chinese. Religion in China. DOI link for Religion in China. Religion in China book. A Brief Account of the Three Religions of the Chinese.

By Joseph. The book is based on Yang’s theoretical framework of triple markets of religion in China: red, black and gray.

The red market is composed of the five religions – Buddhism, Catholicism, Taoism (also Daoism), Islam and Protestantism under patriotic associations – approved by the government. • The Souls of China: The Return of Religion After Mao is published by Allen Lane.

To order a copy for £ (RRP £25) go to or Author: Julia Lovell. From the Pulitzer Prize winning journalist: a revelatory portrait of religion in China today its history, the spiritual traditions of its Eastern and Western faiths, and the ways in which it is influencing China s future.

Following a century of violent antireligious campaigns, China is now awash with new temples, churches, and mosques as well as cults, sects, and politicians trying to harness.

The Book of Mormon maintains there was an appearance of Jesus in the New World following the Christian account of his resurrection, and that the Americas are uniquely blessed continents. Mormonism believes earlier Christian traditions, such as the Roman Catholic, Orthodox, and Protestant reform faiths, are apostasies and that Joseph Smith's.

Making Religion, Making the State combines cutting-edge perspectives on religion with rich empirical data to offer a challenging new argument about the politics of religion in modern China.

The volume goes beyond extant portrayals of the opposition of state and religion to emphasize their mutual constitution. It examines how the modern category of religion is enacted and implemented in.

At the outset of this account of China’s astounding religious revival since the end of the Mao era in the s, Johnson explains the differences between Chinese religious traditions—Confucianism, Daoism, and Buddhism—and the “Abrahamic” faiths, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam: “Chinese religion had little theology, almost no.

The Souls of China tells the story of one of the world's great spiritual revivals. Following a century of violent anti-religious campaigns, China is From the Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist, a revelatory portrait of religion in China today--its history, the spiritual traditions of its Eastern and Western faiths, and the ways in which it is /5.

Rodney Stark () is the distinguished professor of the social sciences and co-director of the Institute for Studies of Religion at Baylor University, and honorary professor of sociology at Peking University in Beijing.

He is perhaps best known for his book The Rise of Christianity () and his suggested theory that early Christianity grew primarily through gradual individual conversion. China is growing in importance to the economies and governments of the world, and it has been run by men with very different ideas.

How China copes with the pressures for good governance with the Asian economic model, treats its ethnic minorities under scrutiny, and gathers resources to fuel its. Additional Physical Format: Online version: Hughes, E.R.

(Ernest Richard), Religion in China. London, New York, Hutchinson's University Library, Get this from a library. Religion in China.

[Richard Clarence Bush] -- This is a simple introduction to the Chinese traditions of Confucianism, Taoism, and Buddhism. Chinese religion is not an organized, unified system of beliefs and practices. It has no leadership, headquarters, founder, or denominations.

Instead, "Chinese religion" is a term describing the complex interaction of different religious and philosophical traditions that have been influential in nts: million. Recent events—from strife in Tibet and the rapid growth of Christianity in China to the spectacular expansion of Chinese Buddhist organizations around the globe—vividly demonstrate that one cannot understand the modern Chinese world without attending closely to the question of religion.

The Religious Question in Modern China highlights parallels and contrasts between historical events. Religion in Communist China.

Nashville: Abingdon Press, This book gives a broad overview of the Communist party’s historical approach to Protestantism, Catholicism, Islam, Buddhism and folk religion. In terms of methodology, Bush wrote this book without every visiting China and based his research on books and articles, which is not.Popular Religion in China; The Imperial Metaphor by Stephen Feuchtwang I read as several chapters were on the suggested reading list for this week's class.

It was actually the only book on there I had not previously heard of, but that's probably because it's author /5. Popular Religion in China; The Imperial Metaphor by Stephen Feuchtwang I read as several chapters were on the suggested reading list for this week's class.

It was actually the only book on there I had not previously heard of, but that's probably because it's author came from an English anthropological background/5(2).